Comprehensive testing of 10 different ankle braces. Evaluation of passive and rapidly induced stability in subjects with chronic ankle instability

Eils E, Demming C, Kollmeier G, Thorwesten L, Völker K, Rosenbaum D

Research article (journal)

Abstract

Objective. The aim of the present investigation was to test the stability of 10 different ankle braces under passive and rapidly induced loading conditions in a population suffering from chronic ankle instability in order to provide objective information to choose or recommend an appropriate model for specific needs. In addition, the relationship between passive and rapidly induced testing of the stabilizing effect against inversion was evaluated to identify if passive support characteristics of braces are reflected under rapidly induced conditions.Design. An experimental in vivo study with a repeated-measures design was used.Background. Ankle braces are commonly used for treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of ankle injuries. A variety of products exists but there is few information available to assist clinicians, physiotherapists and coaches as well as consumers in choosing a brace on a basis of objective information. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies that provide data for both passively and rapidly induced movement of the ankle joint when using different ankle braces.Methods. Twenty-four subjects with chronic ankle instability participated in the project. Passive ankle range of motion measurements were performed in a custom-built fixture and simulated inversion sprains were elicited on a tilting platform.Results. The tested braces restrict range of motion significantly compared to the no-brace condition for both the passively and rapidly induced inversion and marked differences between braces were revealed. A close relationship between passive and rapidly induced test results for inversion was found.Conclusions. Passive as well as rapidly induced stability tests provide a basis of objective information to describe the characteristics of different ankle braces. Combined results of passive and rapidly induced inversion as well as correlation between results demonstrate that passive support characteristics of braces are reflected under rapidly induced conditions but the amount of restriction is reduced. Therefore, caution should be taken when recommending braces for applications under dynamic circumstances only on the basis of passive support characteristics.RelevanceA basis of information regarding the stability characteristics of different ankle braces under passive and rapidly induced conditions will help the clinician and consumer in choosing the most appropriate brace model for specific use. The results also provide more insights into factors that influence stability characteristics of ankle braces.

Details zur Publikation

Release year: 2002
Language in which the publication is writtenEnglish
Link to the full text: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=yv4JPVwI&eid=2-s2.0-0036706416&md5=e2194b967f7092016adc7131e4fa7184